federal regulatory agencies

Among the unstated powers of the federal (and sometimes state) government that few litigation targets think about is the power of the press release. Prosecutors, whether at the agency level or above (for example, at the state Attorney General’s office or at the Federal Department of Justice), have a hidden tool in their arsenal. It is so simple that many persons and corporations often fail to take it into account in their defense strategy.

Federal regulatory agencies such as the SEC, FCC and FTC, as well as state agencies, have engaged in large-scale public relations campaigns that often seem to undermine the innocent until proven guilty ethos under which they as governmental actors, in particular, labor.

For example, in a recent action by the FTC, the agency conducted a sweep of various infomercial producers which it deemed to be producing false or misleading advertisements. Before even the first court hearing and, in fact, on the same day the complaint was issued, the FTC conducted a carefully-orchestrated press conference to tout their latest “pro consumer” lawsuit. The regulatory agencies usually come up with a fancy “handle” by which they identify their work. These lawsuits often have military-style monikers such as “Operation Clean Sweep,” or “Operation Restore Trust.”

In many cases, a regulatory agency will sue a number of targets, be they advertisers, hedge funds, banks, etc. all at once in coordinated actions. The trouble with this strategy is that while there may be several bad actors in the group, everyone is tarred with the same devastating brush. This is trial by the court of public opinion. The “sweep” is now invariably accompanied by a high-profile press conference, website release and press releases. To even the casual observer, it should be obvious that this strategy is aimed more at making the reputation of the individual agency enforcer than in actually doing justice. While some private plaintiffs like to use press releases as a litigation strategy (usually a bad one), this issue is far worse when the government is a party-plaintiff.
Continue Reading Federal Regulatory Authority and Power of the Press Release