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Tag Archives: infringement

Did the Supreme Court Just Close the Door on Eastern District of Texas Patent Plaintiffs?

Posted in Patent Law

For over 25 years, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the United States district courts have interpreted the patent venue statute 28 U.S.C. §1400(b) to allow plaintiffs to bring patent infringement cases against a corporation in any district court where there is personal jurisdiction over that corporate defendant.  The U.S. Supreme Court… Continue Reading

Tavern on the Green Trademark Battle Round #2

Posted in Trademark Law

The City of New York has reignited the battle over the trademark TAVERN ON THE GREEN. Last month the City of New York filed a lawsuit for trademark infringement against Tavern on the Green International LLC, the successor-in-interest to Tavern on the Green operator, LeRoy Adventures, Inc. LeRoy Adventures operated Tavern on the Green from… Continue Reading

Divided Infringement – Expanding Patent Infringement Liability

Posted in Patent Law, Web/Tech

By Audrey Millemann In 2015, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals cast the net of patent infringement liability even more broadly, to cover direct infringement by “divided” (or “joint”) infringement.  Akamai Technologies, Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc., 797 F.3d 1020 (Fed. Cir. 2015) (“Akamai V”).  In that case, the Federal Circuit established that a defendant… Continue Reading

Website Listing of Tequila Client Work Gets PR Firm a Trademark Shot

Posted in Copyright Law, Patent Law, Trademark Law

Can the owner of renowned tequila brand Patrón prevent a former marketing and PR firm from listing it as a client on its website and discussing the services it provided?  Patrón believes it can and has sued its former marketing firm, The Reindeer Group, for trademark infringement in Federal court in Texas. In 2009 Patrón… Continue Reading

The Seattle Seahawks’ 12th Man Flies Again

Posted in Trademark Law

If you regularly follow our publication, you may remember when I discussed the Seattle Seahawks and their use of the Texas A&M trademark “12TH MAN” over a year ago. If not, that’s okay too. In short, I discussed how the Seattle Seahawks have been utilizing the Texas A&M trademark without permission and were facing legal… Continue Reading

INDUCED INFRINGEMENT BECOMES MORE DIFFICULT TO DEFEND

Posted in Patent Law

In Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc. v. NuVasive, Inc. (June 3, 2016) 2016 U.S. App. LEXIS 10092, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals broadly interpreted the Supreme Court’s test for induced infringement, finding irrelevant the defendant’s belief that there was no infringement. Warsaw and a related company, Medtronic, sued NuVasive for patent infringement.  NuVasive counterclaimed against Warsaw… Continue Reading

Copyright Infringement and the First Sale Defense

Posted in Copyright Law

The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in the case of Dolby Systems, Inc. v. Christenson, focuses primarily on the issue of which party bears the initial burden of proof with regard to a “first sale” defense in a copyright infringement action. As the reader will see, however, this case really provides a cautionary tale as to… Continue Reading

ISPs That Ignore Notices From “Copyright Trolls” Risk Losing DMCA Safe Harbor Protections

Posted in Copyright Law, Uncategorized

Representing copyright owners attempting to enforce online infringement is often routine, but can sometimes prove challenging. This tends to be the case when a content owner is trying to address large scale infringement of one or multiple works. Most often ISPs are cooperative, but on occasion an ISP may resist responding to a content owner… Continue Reading

Patent Infringement and Appellate Jurisdiction

Posted in Patent Law

In general, any appeal from a civil action involving claims of patent infringement must be made to the Federal Circuit in Washington, D.C. A recent case from the Ninth Circuit, Amity Rubberized Pen Company v. Market Quest Group, illustrates this principle as well as demonstrating the practical measures an appellate court will take to help… Continue Reading

“Desert Warrior” Vanquished: Google Defeats Cindy Lee Garcia’s Copyright Claims

Posted in Copyright Law

Cindy Lee Garcia thought she was playing a bit part in “Desert Warrior,” an adventure film being made by an amateur film maker. The film was never completed. Instead, Ms. Garcia’s performance was re-purposed, and her physical on screen appearance was used in a film titled “Innocence of Muslims,” with her voice redubbed, changing her… Continue Reading

Patent Owners have Burden of Proof in Declaratory Judgment Actions

Posted in Patent Law

By: Audrey A. Millemann On January 22, 2014, the United States Supreme Court decided that a patent owner has the burden of proving infringement in an action filed by a licensee for a declaratory judgment of noninfringement. This case, Medtronic, Inc. v. Mirowski Family Ventures, LLC, 2014 U.S. LEXIS 788 (2014), reversed a Federal Circuit… Continue Reading

Copyright Preemption and Its Interplay with Trade Secret Misappropriation

Posted in Copyright Law, Trade Secrets

By: James Kachmar A recent decision in the case Jobscience, Inc. v. CVPartners, Inc. (N.D. Cal. Jan. 9, 2014) shows the interplay between the various theories of intellectual property claims. There, the plaintiff asserted claims for both copyright infringement and trade secret misappropriation arising out of the alleged theft of its software code. The court… Continue Reading

Patent Infringement: Attorneys’ Fees A Little Easier to Get

Posted in Patent Law

By Audrey A. Millemann               The Federal Circuit has loosened the standard for recovering attorneys’ fees in patent infringement cases, making it easier for winning defendants to obtain their fees from plaintiffs.              The case is Kilopass Technology, Inc. v. Sidense Corp. (Fed. Cir. Dec. 26, 2013), 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 25671. Kilopass and Sidense… Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit: Watch Out for Statute of Limitations for Copyright Infringement

Posted in Copyright Law

 By: Audrey A. Millemann              In Seven Arts Filmed Entertainment, Ltd. v. Content Media Corp. PLC, 2013 US App. LEXIS 22517 (9th Cir., November 6, 2013), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decided an issue of first impression in this circuit: whether a claim of copyright infringement based on disputed ownership would be time-barred… Continue Reading

When Product Resales Constitute Trademark Infringement

Posted in Trademark Law

by Jeff Pietsch Earlier this month, the Tenth Circuit court upheld a preliminary injunction granted in favor of a manufacturer of electronics equipment against a reseller of its goods in a trademark infringement action. (Beltronics v. Midwest Inventory Distribution (10th Cir. April 9, 2009)). The reseller argued that it was able to resell the manufacturer’s… Continue Reading

Not Just For Promotional Use

Posted in Copyright Law

By Scott Hervey  Have you ever been into a used record store (remember those) and picked up a used CD that had the following language either on the CD case or on the CD itself: FOR PROMOTIONAL USE ONLY This CD is the property of the record company and is licensed to the intended recipient… Continue Reading