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Category Archives: Patent Law

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Patent Myths Corrected – Part One

Posted in Patent Law

Patent law is a complicated area of law governed by a confusing set of statutes and regulations that are interpreted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) and the federal courts.  Patents themselves are sometimes almost unintelligible and, if intelligible, may require many hours of reading to understand.  It is no wonder that… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Cuts Back Patent Owners’ Post-Sale Rights

Posted in Patent Law, Trademark Law

Patent owners can no longer restrict the use of their patented products after the products are sold.  Under the doctrine of patent exhaustion, a patent owner’s rights are “exhausted” once the patent owner sells the product.  In Impression Products v. Lexmark International, Inc., 2017 U.S. LEXIS 3397 (May 30, 2017), the Supreme Court expanded the… Continue Reading

U.S. Supreme Court Allows Early Notice For Biosimilars

Posted in Patent Law

In SANDOZ INC. v. AMGEN INC. et al., the United States Supreme Court in a unanimous opinion ruled that biosimilar makers can give their required 180-day statutory notice of sales before their products win approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).  In short, the Court held a biosimilar maker “may provide notice… Continue Reading

Eagles Ltd. v. Hotel California Baja, LLC: Any Time of Year, You Can Find Infringement Here

Posted in Copyright Law, Patent Law, Trademark Law

Recently, Eagles Ltd. (the “Eagles”), the entity in control of legendary rock band The Eagles’ business affairs, filed a lawsuit against Hotel California Baja, LLC for trademark infringement. While I’m sure most of us are familiar with the Eagles’ song Hotel California, it may come as a surprise to most trademark aficionados that the Eagles… Continue Reading

Did the Supreme Court Just Close the Door on Eastern District of Texas Patent Plaintiffs?

Posted in Patent Law

For over 25 years, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the United States district courts have interpreted the patent venue statute 28 U.S.C. §1400(b) to allow plaintiffs to bring patent infringement cases against a corporation in any district court where there is personal jurisdiction over that corporate defendant.  The U.S. Supreme Court… Continue Reading

Federal Circuit Holds Non-Public Sales Can Still Satisfy the On-Sale Bar for Patents under the AIA

Posted in Patent Law

In Helsinn Healthcare S.A. v. Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc., the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recently ruled that the America Invents Act’s (“AIA”) did not change the meaning of the on-sale bar provision in 35 U.S.C. § 102.   The on-sale bar provision holds that sales of an invention one year prior… Continue Reading

Are the Tides Turning for Motions to Amend Claims in IPR Proceedings?

Posted in Patent Law

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB”) has rarely allowed patent owners to replace or modify claims during inter partes review (“IPR”), covered business method review, or post-grant review.  In fact, in April 2016 the PTAB’s Motion to Amend Study reported that only 6 of 118, or about 5%, of such motions to amend claims… Continue Reading

More Patent Invalidated as Abstract Ideas

Posted in Patent Law

Apple just escaped a $533 million jury verdict by invalidating the plaintiff’s patents on the grounds that the patents cover abstract ideas. The case is Smartflash, LLC v. Apple Inc., decided by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals on March 1, 2017.  Smartflash owned three patents for technology that limited Internet access to data (video,… Continue Reading

U.S. Supreme Court Limits Laches Defense in Patent Cases

Posted in Patent Law

In SCA Hygiene Products AB et al. v. First Quality Baby Products LLC et al., the United States Supreme Court held that laches cannot be invoked as a defense against a claim for patent infringement damages brought within U.S.C §286’s 6-year limitations period.  The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit had previously held… Continue Reading

One Is Not Enough for Patent Infringement Under 35 U.S.C. §271(f)(1)

Posted in Patent Law

In Life Technologies v. Promega Corporation, the U.S. Supreme Court addressed whether supplying a single component from the United States of a multicomponent invention assembled abroad constitutes patent infringement under 35 U.S.C. §271(f)(1).    Under §271(f)(1), a party can be liable for patent infringement if it supplies from the United States “all or a substantial portion… Continue Reading

Divided Infringement – Expanding Patent Infringement Liability

Posted in Patent Law, Web/Tech

By Audrey Millemann In 2015, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals cast the net of patent infringement liability even more broadly, to cover direct infringement by “divided” (or “joint”) infringement.  Akamai Technologies, Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc., 797 F.3d 1020 (Fed. Cir. 2015) (“Akamai V”).  In that case, the Federal Circuit established that a defendant… Continue Reading

Northern District of California Revises Local Patent Rules

Posted in Copyright Law, Legal Info, Patent Law

On January 17, 2017, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California issued revisions to its Local Patent Rules requiring early disclosure of damages-related discovery and contentions. The revised rules are effective immediately in all patent cases pending in the Northern District.  Local Patent Rules are rules that apply to all civil… Continue Reading

Paramount and Star Trek Fan Film Producers Settle

Posted in Copyright Law, Entertainment Law, Patent Law, Trademark Law

Paramount and Star Trek Fan Film Producers Settle The copyright infringement lawsuit between Star Trek fan film producer, Axanar Productions, and Paramount Pictures came to an end less than two weeks before trial.  The settlement was undoubtedly triggered by the court’s early January ruling that the fan fiction film, Prelude to Axanar, is not protected… Continue Reading

Federal Circuit Requires Standing to Appeal PTAB’s Final Decisions

Posted in Copyright Law, Patent Law, Trademark Law

Although arguably foreshadowed, some may be surprised to learn that a party with the right to challenge the validity of a patent at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) may not have the right to appeal an unfavorable decision.  In Phigenix v. ImmunoGen, the Federal Circuit clarified that while there is no standing… Continue Reading

“It’s In The Game” – Proof Issues In Software Copyright Infringement Cases

Posted in Copyright Law, Entertainment Law, Patent Law, Web/Tech

A recent Ninth Circuit decision in Antonick v. Electronic Arts, Inc. (filed Nov. 22, 2016), shows some of the proof issues that a plaintiff may encounter in prosecuting claims for copyright infringement in connection with software.  A jury found in favor of plaintiff’s claims of infringement; however, the trial court granted the defendant’s motion for… Continue Reading

Law Firm Survives Disqualification Motion in Florida Patent Infringement Lawsuit

Posted in Patent Law

In Lanard Toys Limited v. Toys “R” Us, Inc. et al, 3-15-cv-00849 (FLMD December 16, 2016, Order) (Barksdale, MJ), a patent infringement matter in Florida District Court, the court denied defendants’ motion to disqualify plaintiff’s new counsel for simultaneously representing defendant in an unrelated case.  Four months after lawyers with Gordon & Rees Scully Mansukhani… Continue Reading

Holiday Horror Series: Part 1- Could You Patent Christmas?!

Posted in Copyright Law, Patent Law

The holidays are upon us.  Given that everything seems to be protected by intellectual property rights, could someone protect Christmas? The most likely candidate to try to patent Christmas would be Santa Claus.  But (assuming all other issues are addressed), could Santa Claus really patent Christmas? Assuming that Santa Claus invented Christmas, then perhaps he… Continue Reading

Federal Circuit Takes A Common Law Approach to “Abstract Idea” Determinations in Alice Cases

Posted in Copyright Law, Entertainment Law, Legal Info, Patent Law, Trademark Law, Web/Tech

By:  Eric Caligiuri In Amdocs (Israel) Ltd. v. Openet Telecom Inc. et al., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recently upheld four software patents against a patent-eligibility challenge, finding that the patents do not claim an “abstract idea.”  The patent challenge was under the frame work set out by the U.S. Supreme… Continue Reading