In this episode of The Briefing by the IP Law BlogScott Hervey and Josh Escovedo discuss a copyright dispute between Carroll Shelby Licensing and the widow of the late filmmaker H. B. Halicki regarding copyright protection granted to Eleanor, a car featured in the 1974 film “Gone in 60 Seconds.” Continue Reading What Makes a Character Protectable Under Copyright

In Jacobs et al v. The Journal Publishing Company et al, 1-21-cv-00690, District Judge Martha Vazquez of the District Court of New Mexico recently held Plaintiffs’ twenty-two-month delay in filing suit rebutted any presumption of irreparable harm for alleged copyright violations, and accordingly denied Plaintiffs’ motion for a preliminary injunction. Continue Reading District Court Rules Twenty-Two Month Delay in Filing Copyright Case Favors Denying Plaintiffs’ Request for Preliminary Injunction

Ohio State University recently made Intellectual Property headlines by managing to procure a trademark registration for the word THE. The registration procured by Ohio State covers t-shirts, caps, and hats. Although the registration covers limited goods and services, that hasn’t stopped people from being outraged by the idea that a person or entity can obtain exclusive rights to use of the most commonly used word in the English language. But is it really that big of a deal? In my humble opinion, it is not. Continue Reading Ohio State Successfully Registers the Word THE with the Trademark Office