Graffiti artists Nekst and Bates have filed a lawsuit against Guess and Macy’s for incorporating their tags in various articles of clothing. Scott Hervey and James Kachmar discuss this case in the next installment of “The Briefing.”Continue Reading The Briefing: Tag, You’re Sued: Graffiti Artists Sue Over Use of Their Tags

As James Kachmar previously wrote on the IP Law Blog, the man who was photographed as a naked baby in 1991 for Nirvana’s iconic “Nevermind” album cover is now suing the band for distributing child pornography. Scott Hervey and James discuss the Ninth Circuit’s opinion on the case in this episode of The Briefing.Continue Reading The Briefing: Nirvana Stuck in Lawsuit Over “Nevermind” Album Cover

On February 12, 2024, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) issued guidance on the patentability of inventions developed with the assistance of artificial intelligence, saying that a human must have made a “significant contribution” to the invention. The USPTO explained that while AI-assisted inventions are not categorically unpatentable, the inventorship analysis should focus on human contributions, as patents function to incentivize and reward human ingenuity. Thus, patent protection may be sought for inventions for which a natural person provided a significant contribution to the invention, and the guidance provides procedures for determining the same.Continue Reading USPTO Issues Guidance on Patentability of Inventions Developed with the Assistance of Artificial Intelligence

As Scott Hervey previously wrote on the IP Law Blog, the holding in the Supreme Court case Jack Daniels Properties v. VIP Products limits the applicability of the Rogers test. Scott and Jamie Lincenberg talk about this case on this episode of The Briefing.Continue Reading The Briefing: Ninth Circuit Pulls Back Rogers Test in Light of Jack Daniels Decision