At last, the NCAA has changed its policy on college athletes monetizing their name, image, and likeness, also known as their NIL. Who cares if the Supreme Court forced the NCAA’s hands in Alston v. NCAA, which didn’t directly address the issue but provided clear indicia that the Court intended to deal with the issue eventually? What matters is that college athletes can finally market their valuable NIL and enrich themselves while the NCAA is enriching itself during their college careers. But, of course, no benefit comes without its risks.
Continue Reading Pitfalls Related to NCAA’s New Policy on Name, Image and Likeness

I’m experiencing déjà vu. I wrote about a similar topic prior to Allegiant Air becoming the official sponsor of the Las Vegas stadium that the Raiders now call home. In fact, I covered the topic at a time when Allegiant Air claimed that it was not involved in any negotiations for the naming rights of any professional sports facilities despite having filed an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office for use of Allegiant in connection with stadium or training facilities.

Continue Reading Will Starbucks Become the Next Corporate Sponsor of a Professional Sports Facility?