Photo of Jessica R. Corpuz

Jessica Corpuz is a shareholder at Weintraub Tobin. She represents clients in all aspects of litigation, including in particular the handling of complex business and commercial disputes. Jessica has successfully represented clients in trial, mediation, arbitration, and appeal. She has litigated cases in fields related to licensing and distribution agreements, private equity acquisitions and corporate transactions, international law, breach of contract, fraud, and complex judgment collection, among others.

Many people associate brands with particular colors – if you think of Tiffany & Co., you think of its famous robins-egg blue boxes and branding; if you think of Barbie, you can see the bright pink that came with so many childhood toys. Not many people realize, however, that brands can trademark those colors and prevent others from using them.
Continue Reading Corporations Can Own Colors – and They Can Sue You for Using “Their” Color

On June 22, 2022, a New York federal judge dismissed a claim by popular TikTok creator Kelly Manno against Michael Che (former cast member on Saturday Night Live.) Manno claimed that Che copied a comedy bit posted on her TikTok account for his HBO show “That Damn Michael Che.”  Manno sued Che, NBCUniversal, (which produces the show,) and WarnerMedia (which owns HBO Max) alleging copyright infringement.
Continue Reading Michael Che of SNL Fame Beats Infringement Claim by TikTok Creator

A recent case filed by famous choreographer Kyle Hanagami is set to test the boundaries of copyright law in video games and on social media.

Mr. Hanagami is a popular choreographer with a large YouTube presence.  He won the 2020 iHeart Music Award for Favorite Music Video Choreography for BlackPink’s “Kill This Love” and holds the title for YouTube’s most viewed choreography video of all time. Crucially, he also holds the copyright to the dance to the Charlie Puth song “How Long.”
Continue Reading Choreographer Challenges Fortnite’s Use of His Copyrighted Dance Moves

We previously wrote about a lawsuit filed in the Northern District of California against Instagram regarding the use of Instagram’s embedding tools. The plaintiffs, in that case, are two photojournalists who captured images of the George Floyd protests and the 2016 election and posted them to Instagram. Various media companies embedded the photos using Instagram’s proprietary embedding tools. The photos, therefore, appeared on websites without any license from the original photographers.
Continue Reading Instagram Defeats Embedding Lawsuit